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J Occup Health year 1997 volume 39 number 2 page 105 - 112
Classification Original
Title Prevention of a Malaria Outbreak among Non-Immune Japanese Workers Engaged in the Construction of a Thermal Power Plant in Sonebhadra, India
Author Hironobu Katsuyama1, Shigeyuki Kano2, Mamoru Suzuki2, Kiyofumi Saijoh3, Kimiaki Sumino4 and Goro Tsuchiya1
Organization 1Department of Health, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Kobe Shipyard,
2Department of Parasitology, Gunma University School of Medicine,
3Department of Hygiene, Kanazawa University School of Medicine and
4Department of Public Health, Kobe University School of Medicine
Keywords Malaria, Non-immune Japanese workers, On-site inspection, Protective measures
Correspondence
Abstract Prevention of a Malaria Outbreak among Non-Immune Japanese Workers Engaged in the Construction of a Thermal Power Plant in Sonebhadra, India: Hironobu Katsuyama, et al. Department of Health, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries-Continuous consumption of anti-malarial drugs is not always recognized as the first choice for prevention of malaria among workers residing in malarious areas for long periods. In Japan, personal protective measures have been primarily recommended. However, a high incidence of malaria was observed among workers engaged in construction of a thermal power plant in the Sonebhadra district, Uttar Pradesh, India, during the period from February to August, 1991. On-site inspection revealed the difficulties of preventing mosquito bites among personnel who had lived in industrialized countries and were not immune to malaria. Repeated education regarding the danger of malaria and rigorous precautions from mosquito bites dramatically reduced the incidence of malaria among such personnel. Not only proper usage of personal protection measures such as long sleeved shirts, mosquito repellents, mosquito nets etc., but also an effort to reduce the number of mosquitoes in living and working areas by such means as insecticides, spraying operations, etc. should be emphasized. On the other hand, chemoprophylaxis still seemed to be the most effective protective measure for workers compelled to remain outdoors until late at night. The utility and availability of protective divices may depend on the working status and circumstances, so that on-site inspection helps to ensure occupational health, and also affords an opportunity to instruct the workers on malaria prevention.