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J Occup Health year 1998 volume 40 number 4 page 276 - 278
Classification Original
Title Protective Efficacy of Solanum Hainanense Hance during Hepatotoxicity in Male Mice with Prolonged and Small Oral Doses of Trinitrotoluene
Author Nguyen Phuc THAI1, Le Van TRUNG2, Nguyen Khac HAI3 and Le HUYNH3
Organization 1Department of Occupational Health, Military Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology,
2National Institute of Occupational and Environmental Health and
3Military School of Medicine
Keywords Trinitrotoluene, TNT, Mice, Liver, Hepatotoxicity, Solanum hainanense hance
Correspondence
Abstract Protective efficacy of Solanum Hainanense Hance During Hepatotoxicity in Male Mice with Prolonged and Small Oral Doses of Trinitrotoluene: Nguyen Phuc THAI, et al. Department of Occupational Health, Military Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology-A cluster of patients with anemia, aplasia, methemoglobinemia and hepatotoxicity were found among workers in explosive material factories in Vietnam. Trinitrotoluene (TNT) was suspected of causing the disorders. This study aims to evaluate the use of Solanum hainanense Hance for liver protection of white mice which were poisoned with prolonged and small oral doses of TNT. Thirty-six mice were assigned equally to 3 groups: control group, poisoned group and protected group. The poisoned group received a TNT oral dose of 100 mg/kg body weight daily 6 times weekly for 6 wk, and the protected group were administered a Solanum hainanense hance solution dose of 6 g/kg body weight daily 4 h before receiving the same dose as the poisoned group. They were followed up for 6 wk. Body and liver weights were measured, tissues were histopathologically examined and laboratory tests (glucose, MetHb, -SH concentrations and serum AST, ALT) were done at the end of the experiment. The results were as follows: Serum AST and ALT activities were significantly different in the three groups (Control group: 280 plusmn 107 and 55.2 plusmn 22.5 U/l; Poisoned group: 486 plusmn 267 and 102.8 plusmn 44.9 U/l; Protected group: 288 plusmn 164 and 78.3 plusmn 9.6 U/l). MetHb, glucose and -SH concentrations were changed by TNT, and these changes were increased in the Solanum hainanense hance-protected group but the increase was not statistically significant. The cut off point at 1483 mg and ratios of hepatomegaly were significantly different in the three groups (Control group: 1/12; Poisoned group: 10/12; Protected group: 6/12). The cut off point at 58.7% and ratios of increase in density of the liver and of body weights were significantly different in the three groups (Control group: 1/12; Poisoned group; 6/12; Protected group 3: 1/12). Histological examination of the livers showed normal histological features in control mice, histopathological lesions in TNT-poisoned mice and the alleviation of TNT-induced lesions in protected mice. TNT has caused histopathological lesions and changed liver function tests. These lesions and changes in biochemical tests could be significantly restricted by Solanum hainanense Hance solution. The results suggest that Solanum hainanense hance could protect against TNT-induced liver damage.