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J Occup Health year 1998 volume 40 number 4 page 319 - 324
Classification Original
Title A Multi-Centre Cross-Sectional Survey on Safety at Construction Sites in Thailand, 1994-1995
Author Construction Worker Research Group of Thailand:
Virasakdi CHONGSUVIVATWONG1, Suparb PAS-ONG1, Skulrat RITSMITHCHAI1, Louis LEBEL1,
Pirom KAMOLRATTANAKUL2, Bodi DHANAMUN2, Venus UDOMPRASERTKUL2,
Tuanchai INTHUSOMA2, Apinun ARAMRATTANA3, Anchalee SINGHANETRA-RENARD3,
Kannikar BUNTEONGJIT3, Nuthaya SAKSOONG3, Arun CHIRAWATKUL4,
Bandit THINKHAMROP4, Siriporn CHIRAWATKUL4, Boonsri PRAB-NA-SAKDI4,
Wichai AEKPLAKORN5, Sangchome KERDKAUY5 and Sonthaya THANOMSAUY5
Organization 1Prince of Songkla University, 2Chulalongkorn University, 3Chiangmai University,
4Khon Kaen University and 5Division of Epidemiology, Ministry of Public Health
Keywords Construction workers, Work-related mortality, Morbidity, Safety, Thailand
Correspondence
Abstract A Multi-Centre Cross-Sectional Survey on Safety at Construction Sites in Thailand, 1994-1995: Construction Worker Research Group of Thailand-A multi-centre cross-sectional study was conducted under a uniform protocol in rapidly developing municipal areas in eight provinces of Thailand: Bangkok, Chonburi, Chiang Mai, Pisanulok, Khon Kaen, Nong Kai, Hat Yai and Phuket. Altogether information was collected by structured questionnaire interviews and inspection from 184 construction sites, 242 subcontractors, 171 workers' camps and 3614 workers. Males comprised 66% of the workers. 47% of the workers had worked 4 or more years in the industry. The majority (78%) had come from an agricultural background. Standards of education were uniformly low. Companies on small construction sites provided less protection facilities than at large scale construction sites and the injury rate in the former was 1.83 times higher. A nail in the foot was the most common injury (61%) resulting in stopping work. The overall incidence of injuries resulting in stopping work averaged 1.5 per 100 worker-months. Twelve work-related deaths were recorded at the construction sites studied. Causes were fall (4), electrocution (4), machinery (2) falling object (1) vehicle (1). The work-related death rate was 68 per 100,000 worker-years (95%CI 35-118). This rate is 2-5 times higher than those reported in western countries. Construction sites in Thailand have poor safety measures. The injury incidence rate and mortality rate are high.