Get full text report (pdf file; Read by ADOBE Acrobat Reader)
J Occup Health year 1998 volume 40 number 4 page 325 - 333
Classification Original
Title Differences in Lifestyle and Perceived Health in Different Occupations in a Community
Author Akiko OHTA1, Kazuo TAKEUCHI2, SASAZAWA Yosiaki1, and Shosuke SUZUKI1
Organization 1Department of Public Health, Gunma University School of Medicine,
2Gunma Prefectural College of Health Sciences
Keywords Occupation, Perceived health, Lifestyle, Social network, Community, The Todai Health Index (THI), Blue-collar workers, White-collar workers, Agricultural and forestry workers
Correspondence
Abstract Differences in Lifestyle and Perceived Health in Different Occupations in a Community: Akiko OHTA, et al. Department of Public Health, Gunma University School of Medicine-It has been reported that morbidity and mortality vary according to occupation. To clarify factors which account for these differences, lifestyle, social network, job satisfaction and perceived health were measured in 1,165 men 40-59 years old residing in a rural village in Gunma, Japan. Comparisons were made of four occupational groups: agricultural and forestry workers, the self-employed, blue-collar workers, and white-collar workers. Agricultural and forestry workers had less obesity, good social networks with relatives and local community, lower job satisfaction, and less subjective physical symptoms and psychological complaints. The self-employed had higher job satisfaction but felt their jobs were hard. Blue-collar workers had lower job satisfaction, felt that their job was hard, and had the most subjective physical symptoms and psychological complaints. White-collar workers were the most obese, ate more Western-style foods, had more physical exercise, higher job satisfaction, did not feel the job was hard, had stronger marriage ties, and had fewer subjective physical symptoms and psychological complaints. These differences may account for differences in morbidity and mortality by occupation, and will provide useful information for health care planning in the respective occupational group. For example, improved health care will be needed for blue-collar workers who had the poorest perceived health in the community.