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J Occup Health year 2000 volume 42 number 2 page 66 - 71
Classification Original
Title Recovery from Mental Ill Health in an Occupational Setting:
A Cohort Study in Japan
Author Yoshio MINO1, Jun SHIGEMI1, Toshihide TSUDA1, Nobufumi YASUDA2, Akira BABAZONO3 and Paul BEBBINGTON4
Organization 1Department of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, Okayama University Medical School,
2Department of Public Health, Kochi Medical School, 3Institute of Health Science, Kyushu University and
4University College of London, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Medicine
Keywords Job stress, Recovery, Mental health, Cohort study
Correspondence Y. Mino, Department of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, Okayama University Medical School, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558, Japan
Abstract Recovery from Mental Ill Health in an Occupational Setting: A Cohort Study in Japan: Yoshio MINO, et al. Department of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, Okayama University Medical School-Objectives: The purpose of this study is to clarify the degree of recovery from mental ill health in occupational settings and the nature of perceived job stress associated with recovery. Methods: A 1-year cohort study was carried out in 287 of 763 workers who scored 8 or more on the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30), and the proportion recovering during the year was compared according to the presence of individual perceived job stress items. To control confounding factors, multiple logistic analysis was used. Results: Recovery from mental ill health was observed in 48.7% after the first 6 months and in 66.1% after 1 year. During the first 6-month period, no identified job stress item was associated with recovery. During the second 6-month period, however, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) between recovery and the absence of perceived job stress was 4.2 (1.3-13.1) for "Too much responsibility", even after controlling for sex, age, the degree of family life satisfaction, physical health state, and the initial GHQ score. Conclusion: Relief from excessive responsibility might promote recovery in mentally ill workers.