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J Occup Health year 2000 volume 42 number 4 page 185 - 191
Classification Originals
Title Air Pollution and Hospital Admissions for Respiratory Disease in Certain Areas of Korea
Author Belong CHO1, Jaewook CHOI2 and Yong-Tae YUM2
Organization 1Department of Family Medicine, Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
2Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, Korea
Keywords Air pollution, Respiratory disease, Time series analysis, Hospital admission, TSP, NO2, CO
Correspondence B. Cho, Department of Family Medicine, Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University, Yeongeon-dong 28, Chongro-gu, Seoul, Korea
Abstract Air Pollution and Hospital Admissions for Respiratory Disease in Certain Areas of Korea: Belong CHO, et al. Department of Family Medicine, Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University-Recently studies reporting the incidence of diseases at air pollution levels below the recognized standard levels are increasing and the issue is becoming a matter of concern. We therefore examined the relationship between the level of air pollution in three areas of Korea and the incidence of respiratory diseases. Poisson regression models were used to account for day-of-the-week effects and nonparametric smoothing to make adjustments for season and weather in this time series analysis. The levels of air pollution across the three selected areas were characterized by the total suspended particle (TSP) concentration, which in Daejon was 61.28 plusmn 29.22, in Ulsan 72.01 plusmn 25.99, and in Suwon was 82.84 plusmn 30.18. The total number of hospitalized cases due to respiratory diseases during the study period was 5,446. The relative risk of hospitalization due to respiratory diseases caused by air pollutants after accounting for seasonal and temperature effects were as follows:- CO (R.R.; 1.21, 95% C.I.; 1.02-1.44) in a residential area (Daejon), and NO2 (R.R.; 1.47, 95% C.I.; 1.03-2.10) and CO (R.R; 2.51, 95% C.I.; 1.06-5.93) in a heavily industrialized area (Ulsan), and were statistically significant. When the TSP concentration was manipulated as a quintile dummy variable, the relative risk of admission increased by 2.48% (95% C.I.: 1.82%-3.15%) for every quintile increase. In conclusion, respiratory disease admissions are related to NO2, CO, and TSP concentrations below the environmental standard, but the significance of this relationship was area dependent.
(J Occup Health 2000; 42: 185-191)