Get full text report (pdf file; Read by ADOBE Acrobat Reader)
J Occup Health year 2000 volume 42 number 4 page 205 - 212
Classification Originals
Title Bio-Psycho-Socio-Ecological Risk Factors for Legionella Infection among Japanese 24-Hour Hot Water Bath Users and Non-Users
Author Masahiro IRIE1, Hiroshi MIYAMOTO2, Shoji NAGATA1, Masato IKEDA3 and Shin-ichi YOSHIDA4
Organization 1Department of Mental Health, Institute of Industrial Ecological Sciences,
2Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine,
3Department of Occupational Health Economics, Institute of Industrial Ecological Sciences, University of Occupational and Environmental Health and
4Department of Bacteriology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University
Keywords Legionella, Infection, Antibody, Recycled bath water, Stress, Psychoneuroimmunology
Correspondence M. Irie, Department of Mental Health, Institute of Industrial Ecological Sciences, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555, Japan
Abstract Bio-Psycho-Socio-Ecological Risk Factors for Legionella Infection among Japanese 24-Hour Hot Water Bath Users and Non-Users: Masahiro IRIE, et al. Department of Mental Health, Institute of Industrial Ecological Sciences, University of Occupational and Environmental Health-The purpose of this study was to examine the risk of Legionella pneumophila (Lp) infection due to the use of a 24-h hot water bath (24HHWB), which is popular for bathing in Japan because of its water conservation through the use of recycled bath water, and to investigate other possible factors that may be associated with Legionella infection. The risk of anti-Lp serum antibody formation associated with the 24HHWB use and various bio-psycho-socio-ecological factors was estimated based on the logistic model among 204 employees (161 men, 43 women) who were either 24HHWB users or non-users. There was a significantly higher rate of anti-Legionella antibody titers (>=8) in the 24HHWB users than in the non-users, particularly against Lp serogroup (SG) 5 (odds ratio, 16.3; 95% CI, 2.1-126.5; p<0.01) and Lp SG 6 (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.3-6.5; p<0.01). However, most of the titers were <64, and no clinical cases of Legionnaires' disease among the 24HHWB users were found. No significant correlations were observed between the duration of the 24HHWB use and the increased antibody titers. The impossibility of relieving stress, a decrease in age, the usnclusion, the use of a 24HHWB was associated with Legionella sensitization, but not with clinically apparent legionellosis. Psychological, environmental, and lifestyle factors also seemed to have causal relations to antibody formation.
(J Occup Health 2000; 42: 205-212)