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J Occup Health year 2000 volume 42 number 5 page 239 - 244
Classification Original
Title Effect of Truck Driving on Health of Japanese Middle Aged Male Workers of a Transport Company
-Multiple Regression Analyses for Blood Pressure and HbA1C-
Author Yasushi SUWAZONO, Yasushi OKUBO, Etsuko KOBAYASHI and Koji NOGAWA
Organization Department of Hygiene, School of Medicine, Chiba University
Keywords Truck driving, Blood pressure, Blood glucose, Health effects, Multiple regression analysis
Correspondence Y. Suwazono, Department of Hygiene, School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohara, Chuoku, Chiba 260-8670, Japan
Abstract Effect of Truck Driving on Health of Japanese Middle Aged Male Workers of a Transport Company -Multiple Regression Analyses for Blood Pressure and HbA1C-: Yasushi SUWAZONO, et al. Department of Hygiene, School of Medicine, Chiba University-The effect on health of truck driving was investigated in a transport company. The study subjects consisted entirely of Japanese healthy male workers aged 40 yr or more (n=429) and were classified into the three occupations: truck driver, clerical worker, forklift truck driver and laborer. The truck drivers transport goods for short distances and work only in the daytime. The results of an annual health examination were used for comparing variables among occupations. The variables were tested by one-way ANOVA. The percentages of abnormal findings were tested by chi-square test. Multiple regression analyses were performed with SBP, DBP or HbA1C as the dependent variables and age, occupation, smoking, drinking, BMI, gamma-GTP, T-Cho or HbA1C as the independent variables. BMI of truck drivers and Hb of clerical workers were significantly higher than those of forklift truck drivers and laborers in ANOVA. The percentage of obesity (BMI>=26.4) was significantly different in the three occupations, with obesity being most frequent in clerical workers. Multiple regression analysis indicated that age, drinking, BMI and HbA1C were significantly associated with increased SBP. The analysis for DBP indicated that age, drinking and BMI were significantly associated with increased DBP, and smoking was associated with decreased DBP. The analysis for HbA1C indicated that age, BMI and T-Cho were significantly associated with increased HbA1C. Occupation was not significant in these analyses, suggesting that the health effect of driving alone was relatively small in this company.