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J Occup Health year 2000 volume 42 number 6 page 304 - 314
Classification Original
Title The Effects of Job-Related Factors and Lifestyle on the Five-Year Cumulative Incidence of Hypertension in Japanese Steelworkers
Author Yasushi OKUBO, Toshiaki MIYAMOTO, Yasushi SUWAZONO, Etsuko KOBAYASHI and Koji NOGAWA
Organization Department of Hygiene, School of Medicine, Chiba University
Keywords Follow-up study, Incidence, Industrial worker, Office worker, Promotion, Blood pressure, Risk factor
Correspondence Y. Okubo, Department of Hygiene, School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana Chuo-ku Chiba-city Chiba 260-8670, Japan
Abstract The Effects of Job-Related Factors and Lifestyle on the Five-Year Cumulative Incidence of Hypertension in Japanese Steelworkers: Yasushi OKUBO, et al. Department of Hygiene, School of Medicine, Chiba University-We conducted this epidemiological follow-up study from 1990 to 1995 to clarify the effects of job-related factors and/or lifestyle on the five-year cumulative incidence of hypertension in Japanese normotensive steelworkers. The subjects were normotensive 3,061 males aged 40-54 yr, and 2,249 subjects were followed-up completely. Job-related factors (job class, job type and promotion), lifestyle (salt intake, calorie intake, habitual exercise, alcohol consumption and smoking habit) and six subjective symptoms which were thought to be related to mental health were evaluated in relationship to the five-year cumulative incidence of hypertension. The results of the multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that age, mean blood pressure in 1990, and promotion during the five-year period were factors significantly related to hypertension. Odds ratios of age (per 1 year old), mean blood pressure (per 1 mmHg) were 1.08 and 1.19, respectively. Odds ratio of promoted workers to non-promoted workers was 0.56. Promotion was related independently to the five-year cumulative incidence of hypertension. No relationship between hypertension and other job-related factors, blood findings or subjective symptoms was noted. In conclusion, our study suggested that age and mean blood pressure strongly influence the five-year cumulative incidence of hypertension, and promotion reduced the risk of hypertension in male workers.