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J Occup Health year 2001 volume 43 number 6 page 351 - 355
Classification Original
Title Association of Tooth Loss with Psychosocial Factors in Male Japanese Employees
Author Naoji HAYASHI1, Hiroo TAMAGAWA2, Muneo TANAKA1, Takashi HANIOKA1,
Soichiro MARUYAMA3, 4, Tatsuya TAKESHITA3, Kanehisa MORIMOTO3 and
Satoshi SHIZUKUISHI1
Organization 1Department of Preventive Dentistry, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University,
2Division of Interdisciplinary Dentistry, Osaka University Dental Hospital,
3Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University and
4Department of Human Sciences, Faculty of Literature, Kobe Shinwa Women's University
Keywords Tooth loss/periodontal disease, Psychosocial factors, Stress, Alexithymia, Epidemiology
Correspondence S. Shizukuishi, Department of Preventive Dentistry, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan
Abstract Association of Tooth Loss with Psychosocial Factors in Male Japanese Employees: Naoji HAYASHI, et al. Department of Preventive Dentistry, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University-It would seem that good psychosocial conditions would have a positive effect on oral health, but few data exist regarding the association of psychosocial factors with tooth loss. The association between psychosocial factors and tooth loss was studied in male industrial workers in Japan. In an annual health checkup, tooth loss status was assessed by oral examination in 252 workers (age 20-59 yr). Information pertaining to psychosocial factors, lifestyle and oral health behavior was also obtained through a self-administered questionnaire. The mean tooth loss per worker showed a significant increasing trend with age. Mean tooth loss was 0.32 in the 20-29-yr-old group, 0.82 in the 30-39-yr-old group, 1.28 in the 40-49-yr-old group and 2.91 in the 50-59-yr-old group. Bivariate analyses revealed that age (P<0.01) and alexithymia (P<0.05) were significantly associated with tooth loss. In contrast, work stress, depression, type A behavior, job- and life-satisfaction were not significantly associated with tooth loss. In multivariate analyses, the associations of age (P<0.02) and alexithymia (P<0.05) remained statistically significant after adjustment for oral health behavior and lifestyle variables. We suggest that an alexithymic personality may affect tooth loss status in male employees.