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J Occup Health year 2002 volume 44 number 5 page 301 - 306
Classification Original
Title Association between Liver Dysfunction and Hyperglycemia in Japanese Male Workers at Printing and Papermaking Plants
Author Takero KAIDO1, Yasushi HONDA2 and Kuniaki KITAMURA3
Organization 1Osaka Prefecture College of Nursing, 2Institute of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Tsukuba and
3Printing Bureau, Ministry of Finance, Japan
Keywords Epidemiology, Hyperglycemia, Insulin resistance, Liver dysfunction, Asparate amino-transferase, Alanine aminotransferase, Gamma glutamyl transferase
Correspondence T. Kaido, Osaka Prefecture College of Nursing, 3-7-30 Habikino, Habikino City, Osaka 583-8555, Japan
Abstract Association between Liver Dysfunction and Hyperglycemia in Japanese Male Workers at Printing and Papermaking Plants: Takero KAIDO, et al., Osaka Prefecture College of Nursing-This cohort study investigated the association between liver dysfunction and two types of impaired glucose metabolism, i.e., hyperglycemia (HG) and quasi-diabetes mellitus (quasi-DM) (quasi-DM was treated as a subset of HG). Accordingly, the study consists of a quasi-DM study and an HG study. Study subjects were middle-aged male workers at printing and paper-making plants who participated in both 1993 and 1997 annual health checkups. In the quasi-DM study, the number of subjects was 1,422. A logistic regression model revealed that liver dysfunction (AST>40IU/l and/or ALT>40IU/l and/or GGT>80IU/l) and obesity (BMI>=25 kg/m2) in 1993 were associated with an increased risk of having quasi-DM in 1997 (odds ratio (OR) for liver dysfunction = 2.1, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1-4.1; OR for obesity = 2.0, 95%CI: 1.0-4.0). For alcohol intake, the relationship was positive for former drinkers and negative for current drinkers (for former drinkers, OR=2.7, 95%CI: 0.86-8.6, and for current drinkers, OR=0.39, 95%CI: 0.19-0.81). Age and smoking status did not show a meaningful association. In the HG study, the number of subjects was 1,254. In an analysis identical to that of the quasi-DM study, we found that liver dysfunction and obesity in 1993 was associated with an increased risk of having HG in 1997 (for liver dysfunction, OR=1.8, 95%CI: 1.2-2.7, and for obesity OR=1.6, 95%CI: 1.0-2.4). These analyses suggest that liver dysfunction can be a predictor of impaired glucose metabolism.