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J Occup Health year 2004 volume 46 number 3 page 235 - 243
Classification Field Studytudy
Title Ambulatory (24 Hour) Blood Pressure Monitoring in Police Officers
Author Francesco TOMEI1, Maria Valeria ROSATI1, Tiziana Paola BACCOLO1, Emilia CHERUBINI1, Manuela CIARROCCA1, Tiziana CACIARI1 and Enrico TOMAO2
Organization 1University of Rome "La Sapienza", Department of Occupational Medicine and 2Center For Aeromedical Evaluation and Occupational Medicine IML, Italy
Keywords ABPM, Urban pollutants, Psycho-social stressors, Police officers, Outdoor activity
Correspondence F. Tomei, University of Rome "La Sapienza", Department of Occuptional Medicine, Viale-Regina Elena 36, 00161 Rome, Italy (e-mail: francesco.tomei@uniroma1.it)
Abstract Ambulatory (24 Hour) Blood Pressure Monitoring in Police Officers: Francesco TOMEI, et al. University of Rome "La Sapienza", Department of Occupational Medicine, Italy-The aim of the study is to evaluate, by ambulatory (24 h) blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), whether police officers exposed to urban pollutants and possible psycho-social stressors could be at risk of changes in ambulatory systolic blood pressure (SBP), and ambulatory diastolic blood pressure (DBP) compared to controls. After excluding the principal confounding factors, police officers and controls have been subdivided into non-smoker and smoker subjects. Police officers were compared by sex, age, length of service, family history of cardiovascular disease, serum total cholesterol, serum HDL cholesterol, serum LDL cholesterol, plasma triglyceride, body mass index (BMI kg/m2) and drinking habits with controls. Smoker police officers were compared with controls also by the smoking habit. In the non smoker group 77 police officers with outdoor activity (38 men and 39 women) and 87 controls with indoor activity (43 men and 44 women) were studied. In the smoker group 43 police officers (21 men and 22 women) and 29 controls (15 men and 14 women) were studied. In non smoker male police officers ambulatory SBP mean values during 24 h, during day-time and during night-time were significantly higher than controls. In the same group ambulatory DBP values during 24 h and between 6 AM and 11 AM and between 10 PM and 6 AM were significantly higher in police officers than controls. The results suggest that occupational exposure to urban pollutants and possible psycho-social stressors could cause changes in ABPM values in male police officers compared to controls.