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J Occup Health year 2006 volume 48 number 1 page 69 - 73
Classification Field Study
Title Prevalence of Cervical Spondylosis and Musculoskeletal Symptoms among Coolies in a City of Bangladesh
Author Md H. MAHBUB1, Md S. LASKAR1, Farid A. SEIKH2, Md H. ALTAF3, Masaiwa INOUE1, Kenjiro YOKOYAMA1, Tadaki WAKUI4 and Noriaki HARADA1
Organization 1Department of Hygiene, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, Japan, 2National Institute of Preventive and Social Medicine, 3Dhaka Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh and 4Ube College, Japan
Keywords Coolies, Cervical spondylosis, Musculoskeletal symptoms, Prevalence, Bangladesh
Correspondence M.H. Mahbub, Department of Hygiene, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, 1-1-1, Minamikoguchi, Ube 755-8505, Japan (e-mail: b6284@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp)
Abstract Prevalence of Cervical Spondylosis and Musculoskeletal Symptoms among Coolies in a City of Bangladesh: Md H. MAHBUB, et al. Department of Hygiene, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine-To assess the prevalence of cervical spondylosis and musculoskeletal symptoms among coolies a cross-sectional study was performed in Narayangonj City of Bangladesh on a random sample of 98 male coolies, using a questionnaire and the results of cervical spine X-rays. Statistical associations were investigated using the chi-square test. The results show a considerably higher prevalence of cervical spondylosis among the coolies (39.8%). More than half (51.3%) of the cases of cervical spondylosis were in subjects below the age of 40 yr, and a significant association was found between age group and prevalence of cervical spondylosis. The study also observed a significant association between duration of occupation and prevalence of cervical spondylosis. Coolies who had worked for 10 to 15 yr, or more than 15 yr, had higher rates of cervical spondylosis. In this study it was found that those who carried heavier loads suffered more from cervical spondylosis. Musculoskeletal symptoms in multiple body regions (two or more) were more prevalent (61.2%) than those in single body region (29.6%). Symptoms in the hands/fingers were the most frequent followed by the back and arms/forearms. In conclusion, the high prevalence of cervical spondylosis and musculoskeletal symptoms among professional coolies may be associated with the practice of carrying heavy loads on the head. Further study with a large sample of population is required to investigate this problem and to explore preventive measures.