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J Occup Health year 2007 volume 49 number 3 page 183 - 189
Classification Original
Title Effects of Lifestyle on Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene Concentration
Author Toshihiro Kawamoto1, Mihi Yang2, Yong-Dae Kim3, Heon Kim3, Tsunehiro Oyama1,
Toyohi Isse1, Koji Matsuno4, Takahiko Katoh5 and Iwao Uchiyama6
Organization 1Department of Environmental Health, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, 2Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung WomenÕs University, 3Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Chunbuk National University, Korea, 4Bio-information Research Center, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, 5Department of Public Health, Miyazaki University School of Medicine and 6Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Japan
Keywords 1-Hydroxypyrene, Smoking, PAH (polyaromatic hydrocarbon), Biological monitoring, Biomarkers, Dietary balance, Meat, Vegetable, Fish, Alcohol
Correspondence T. Kawamoto, Department of Environmental Health, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, 1Š1 Iseigaoka, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555, Japan (e-mail : kawamott@med.uoeh-u.ac.
Abstract Effects of Lifestyle on Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene Concentration: Toshihiro Kawamoto, et al. Department of Environmental Health, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan-This study aimed to clarify the variation of urinary excretion of 1-hydroxypyrene, which is a major metabolite of pyrene, in relation to lifestyle, including factors such as diet and smoking. The study subjects were 251 workers (male: 196, female: 55, mean age: 44.3) who were not occupationally exposed to PAHs. Urine specimens were collected from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. and their 1-hydroxypyrene concentrations were determined by HPLC. A questionnaire was distributed in order to learn gross aspects of the subjects' lifestyles, i.e., smoking, alcohol consumption, coffee/black tea intake, and dietary habits. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that cigarette consumption most strongly affected the 1-hydroxypyrene level in urine, followed by dietary balance. The urinary 1-hydroxypyrene concentrations of smokers were about 2 times higher than those of non-smokers. Subjects who ate more meat and/or fish excreted 1.5-2 times more 1-hydroxypyrene in urine than those who ate more vegetables.