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J Occup Health year 2007 volume 49 number 3 page 205 - 216
Classification Original
Title Plasma n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Japanese, Korean and Mongolian Workers
Author Akiko NOGI1, 2, Jianjun YANG1, Limei LI1, Masayuki YAMASAKI1, Minako WATANABE1, Michio HASHIMOTO3 and Kuninori SHIWAKU1
Organization 1Department of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Shimane University School of Medicine, 2Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Human Life Science, Yamaguchi Prefectural University and 3Department of Environmental Physiology, Shimane University School of Medicine, Japan
Keywords n-3 PUFA, Fish, Triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol, Insulin resistance, Asian
Correspondence K. Shiwaku, Department of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Shimane University School of Medicine, Enya Cho 89-1, Izumo City, Shimane 693-8501, Japan
(e-mail: shiwaku@med.shimane-u.ac.jp)
Abstract Plasma n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Japanese, Korean and Mongolian Workers: Akiko NOGI, et al. Department of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Shimane University School of Medicine-The favorable role of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been demonstrated in animal experiments and in humans in Western countries, but its effect remains controversial in Asian populations. An observational study of Japanese, Koreans and Mongolians with extended histories of remarkably different frequencies of fish intake was conducted to examine whether differences in plasma n-3 PUFA affects CVD risk factors. We conducted a cross-sectional study in workplace settings and determined body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and fatty acid composition in plasma. A total of 411 Japanese, 418 Korean and 252 Mongolian workers aged 30-60 yr participated in this study. The Japanese ate fish more frequently and had remarkably higher values of eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and n-3 PUFA, and lower values of BMI and HOMA-IR, followed by the Koreans, and then the Mongolians. In age groups, the Japanese and Koreans showed a similar tendency of increase in n-3 PUFA with increasing age. General linear measurement multivariate analysis after adjustment for gender, age, smoking, drinking, exercise habits and BMI showed n-3 PUFA was associated with HDL-C and TG in the Japanese, while it was associated with systolic blood pressure in the Koreans, and TG in the Mongolians. In conclusion, an increase in n-3 PUFA was associated with HDL-C and TG in the Japanese and Mongolians, but these beneficial effects were not constant across the three Asian ethnic groups.