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J Occup Health year 2007 volume 49 number 3 page 217 - 223
Classification Original
Title HPLC-ICP-MS Speciation Analysis of Arsenic in Urine of Japanese Subjects without Occupational Exposure
Author Akihisa HATA1, 2, Yoko ENDO3, Yoshiaki NAKAJIMA3, Maiko IKEBE1, Masanori OGAWA3, Noboru FUJITANI2 and Ginji ENDO1
Organization 1Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, 2Division of Clinical Laboratory Science, Department of Environmental Security System, Faculty of Risk and Crisis Management, Chiba Institute of Science and 3Research Center for Occupational Poisoning, Tokyo Rosai Hospital, Japan Labour Health and Welfare Organization, Japan
Keywords Arsenic, Urine, Speciation, HPLC-ICP-MS, Japanese
Correspondence A. Hata, Division of Clinical Laboratory Science, Department of Environmental Security System, Faculty of Risk and Crisis Management, Chiba Institute of Science, 3, Shiomi-cho, Choshi, Chiba 288-0025, Japan
(e-mail: ahata@cis.ac.jp)
Abstract HPLC-ICP-MS Speciation Analysis of Arsenic in Urine of Japanese Subjects without Occupational Exposure: Akihisa HATA, et al. Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University-The toxicity and carcinogenicity of arsenic depend on its species. Individuals living in Japan consume much seafood that contains high levels of organoarsenics. Speciation analysis of urinary arsenic is required to clarify the health risks of arsenic intake. There has been no report of urinary arsenic analysis in Japan using high performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). We performed speciation analysis of urinary arsenic for 210 Japanese male subjects without occupational exposure using HPLC-ICP-MS. The median values of urinary arsenics were as follows: sodium arsenite (AsIII), 3.5; sodium arsenate (AsV), 0.1; monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), 3.1; dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), 42.6; arsenobetaine (AsBe), 61.3; arsenocholine, trimethylarsine oxide, and unidentified arsenics (others), 5.2; and total arsenic (total As), 141.3gAs/l. The median creatinine-adjusted values were as follows: AsIII, 3.0; AsV, 0.1; MMA, 2.6; DMA, 35.9; AsBe, 52.1; others 3.5; and total As, 114.9gAs/g creatinine. Our findings indicate that DMA and AsBe levels in Japan are much higher than those found in Italian and American studies. It appears that the high levels of DMA and AsBe observed in Japan may be due in part to seafood intake. ACGIH and DFG set the BEI and BAT values for occupational arsenic exposure as 35 gAs/l and 50 gAs/l, respectively, using the sum of inorganic arsenic (iAs), MMA, and DMA. In the general Japanese population, the sums of these were above 50 gAs/l in 115 (55%) samples. We therefore recommend excluding DMA concentration in monitoring of iAs exposure.