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J Occup Health year 2007 volume 49 number 6 page 523 - 527
Classification Field Study
Title Associations of Excessive Sleepiness on Duty with Sleeping Hours and Number of Days of Overnight Work among Medical Residents in Japan
Author Koji Wada1, 2, Yumi Sakata3, Gilles Theriault2, Rie Narai4, Yae Yoshino5, Katsutoshi Tanaka3 and Yoshiharu Aizawa1
Organization 1Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Kitasato University, Japan, 2Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Canada, 3Department of Occupational Mental Health, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kitasato University, 4Department of Environmental Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health and 5Department of Nursing System, School of Nursing, Kitasato University, Japan
Keywords Medical residents, Excessive sleepiness, Sleeping, Overnight
Correspondence K. Wada, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Kitasato University, 1-15-1 Kitasato, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 228-8555, Japan
(e-mail: kwada-sgy@umin.ac.jp)
Abstract Associations of Excessive Sleepiness on Duty with Sleeping Hours and Number of Days of Overnight Work among Medical Residents in Japan: Koji Wada, et al. Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Kitasato University-Despite long-standing concerns regarding the effects of working hours on the performance and health of medical residents, and the patientsŐ safety, prior studies have not shown an association of excessive sleepiness with the number of sleeping hours and days of overnight work among medical residents. In August 2005, a questionnaire was mailed to 227 eligible participants at 16 teaching hospitals. The total number of sleeping hours in the last 30 d was estimated from the average number of sleeping hours during regular days and during days with overnight work, and the number of days of overnight work. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for potentially associated variables. A total of 149 men and 47 women participated in this study. The participation rate was 86.3%. Among the participants, 55 (28.1%) suffered from excessive sleepiness. Excessive sleepiness was associated with sleeping for less than 150 h in the last 30 d (corrected odds ratio [cOR]=1.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-2.16). The number of days of overnight work in the last 30 d showed no association with excessive sleepiness. Excessive sleepiness was also associated with smoking (cOR, 1.65; 95%CI, 1.01-2.32). Medical residents who slept for less than 150 h in the last 30 d and smoked had a significantly higher risk of excessive sleepiness on duty.