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J Occup Health year 2008 volume 50 number 2 page 155 - 162
Classification Originals
Title Psychosocial Work Environment and Well-Being: A Cross-Sectional Study at a Thermal Power Plant in China
Author Shanfa Yu1, 2, Guizhen Gu2, Wenhui Zhou2 and Sheng Wang1
Organization 1Department of Occupational and Environment Medicine, Peking University Health Center and 2Henan Provincial Institute of Occupational Medicine, China
Keywords Job strain, Effort-reward imbalance, Well-being, Social support, Overcommitment
Correspondence S. Wang, Department of Occupational and Environment Medicine, Peking University Health Center, Beijing 100083, China (e-mail: chinastress@sina.com)
Abstract Psychosocial Work Environment and Well-Being: A Cross-Sectional Study at a Thermal Power Plant in China: Shanfa Yu, et al. Department of Occupational and Environment Medicine, Peking University Health Center, China-To investigate the effects of the job demand-control (DC) model and the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) model on worker's well-being, self-reports for psychosocial work conditions and well-being were made by a sample of 878 workers at a thermal power plant in China using the main dimensions of DC and ERI questionnaires. Logistic regression analyses were employed controlling for age, gender, and educational level, and negative and positive affection among others. Workers reporting high job demands and low job control or high efforts and low rewards had elevated risks of job dissatisfaction, psychosomatic complaints and depressive symptoms. Odds ratios were generally higher in workers reporting both high efforts and low rewards. Furthermore, low reward proved to be a stronger predictor of poor well-being when both job stress models were simultaneously adjusted. To some extent, interaction effects were found for social support, but no interaction effects were found for overcommitment. The findings indicate independent effects of both the DC model and the ERI model on well-being. Future work should explore the combined effects of these two models of psychosocial stress at work on health more thoroughly.