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J Occup Health year 2008 volume 50 number 5 page 387 - 399
Classification Originals
Title Evaluation of an Internet-Based Self-Help Program for Better Quality of Sleep among Japanese Workers: A Randomized Controlled Trial 
Author Etsuji SUZUKI1, Masao TSUCHIYA1, 2, Kumi HIROKAWA3, Toshiyo TANIGUCHI4, Toshiharu MITSUHASHI1 and Norito KAWAKAMI2
Organization 1Department of Epidemiology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Mental Health, University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, 3Department of Psychology, Fukuyama University and 4Department of Welfare System and Health Science, Okayama Prefectural University, Japan
Keywords Insomnia, Sleep, Workers, Self-help, Internet, Cognitive therapy, Behavior
Correspondence E. Suzuki, Department of Epidemiology (former Department of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine), Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558, Japan (e-mail: etsuji-s@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp
Abstract Evaluation of an Internet-Based Self-Help Program for Better Quality of Sleep among Japanese Workers: A Randomized Controlled Trial: Etsuji SUZUKI, et al. Department of Epidemiology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences-The effectiveness of Internet-based self-help programs for insomnia is still unclear. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of an Internet-based self-help program for better quality of sleep among adult workers. Forty-three volunteers were recruited and randomly assigned to either an intervention group (n=21) or a waiting-list group (n=22). The intervention group participated in a two-week Internet-based program, including selecting and daily practicing sleep-related target behaviors and monitoring those behaviors along with sleep quality. At the same time, each participant received automatically generated, personalized messages and reports both daily and weekly. A total of 12 intervention group participants and 18 waiting-list group participants completed questionnaires at baseline, post-intervention, and at a 3-wk follow-up. Subjective sleep quality was measured by a self-reported questionnaire developed for this study. The sleep quality score increased in the intervention group at post-intervention, with a significant interaction effect [F(1,28)=5.19, p=0.031]. Sleep-related behaviors also greatly increased in the intervention group at post-intervention, with a significant interaction effect [F(1,28)=7.14, p=0.012]. Sleep-onset latency reduced in the intervention group at follow-up, with a marginally significant effect [F(1,28)=3.52, p=0.071]. The Internet-based self-help program improves subjective sleep quality and sleep-onset latency among adult workers.